about

Surveying at Tharros.

I received a B.A and M.A. in Classics from The Johns Hopkins University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Classical Art and Archaeology from Princeton University. My research explores how and why artifacts and spaces were recycled and repurposed, especially in the ancient Roman world. I examine these themes through what I’ve come to think of as both a macro and a micro lens. The former is exemplified by my work investigating the effect that population movements had on communities and on their sense of identity. The latter is represented by my extensive experience applying digital methods to the study of ancient material culture.

I currently serve as the Director of Strategic Partnerships for The Alexandria Archive Institute / Open Context. I’m also the Data Management Supervisor for the American Excavations at Morgantina: Contrada Agnese Project (AEM:CAP), the Manager of Data and Information Resources for the Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia (PARP:PS), and the Head of Materials for the Tharros Archaeological Research Project. I’ve taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, Walnut Hills High School, Kilgour Elementary School, Claremont McKenna College, Pitzer College, Scripps College, and Pomona College. As the Director of the Digital Humanities Initiative at the Claremont Colleges (DH@CC), I was responsible for developing robust curricula in the digital humanities for faculty, staff, and students across a seven institution consortium. I’m eager to create accessible resources, and I see immense value in sharing works in progress and publishing white papers. I’m furthermore committed to outreach and engaging with diverse audiences outside the classroom in conversations about the past.

When I’m not thinking about ancient bits, I like to spend my time maintaining my Duolingo streak; hiking with my partner-in-crime and our pup; dominating at pub trivia with friends; and experimenting with ambitious vegetarian recipes in the kitchen.